By Clifford Davis
Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public Affairs

In honor of Naval Air Systems Command's Mentoring Awareness Month, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast presented its 2016 NAVAIR Mentor of the Year Award, along with five Dora Quinlan Mentorship Awards Jan. 26.

Sadell Crump, a supervisor in the facility's calibration lab, was named the NAVAIR Mentor of the Year for FRCSE.

"When they initially told me about it, I didn't want to cry," Crump said. "But it was really touching that someone even thought to select me."

Crump has mentored several of her younger coworkers through the years, resulting in many being promoted to different positions at FRCSE. She can be her own worst enemy when it comes to keeping employees, she said. Yet the sense of pride she feels at seeing people achieve their goals and do more to help the warfighter, more than makes up for the loss.

"Some of them don't even realize the potential they possess," Crump said of her coworkers. "I love showing them they can do better than the goals they've set, and then seeing them reach those higher goals is wonderful."

Like Crump, Dora Quinlan was a NAVAIR Mentor of the Year at FRCSE, taking home the inaugural award in 2013. 

Quinlan was the FRCSE business operations director before she passed away from cancer June 14, 2016, leaving behind a son, Derek Pierotti, a daughter, Lacey Pierotti and her husband, Wes Quinlan. 

All three were on-hand to witness the presentation of the inaugural FRCSE Dora Quinlan Mentorship Awards to Phil Hatzitheodorou, a composites engineer, ABF1 Maques Pete of FRCSE Detachment Mayport, supervisory electronics engineer David Rolke, quality assurance specialist Marilyn Brazell and senior aerospace engineer Lindsay Colligan. 

"Dora Quinlan thought everyone had potential, and some people needed help recognizing their potential - that's what Dora did as a mentor," said Tina Testa, a business management specialist and former colleague of Quinlan at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. "Dora was a mentor to everyone officially or unofficially."

FRCSE Executive Officer Capt. Trent Demoss emphasized the example Quinlan set by her willingness to help her colleagues, offering advice and simply being willing to listen.

"Whether you call it coaching, teaching, counseling, mentorship or just caring enough to listen to someone, it's important," DeMoss said. "It is the bedrock and foundation of FRCSE."